Friday, 21 March 2014 18:17

BOATING SAFETY Featured

Written by 

BOATING SAFETY 2014

 

The Klamath County Sheriff’s Office Marine Division would like to remind everyone that the 2014 boating season has arrived in Klamath County. There are a number of planned events on Klamath County lakes and rivers this year including; multiple fishing derby’s such as the Klamath Lake Trophy Trout Fishing Derby, the annual Kinetic Challenge, swim events and two fireworks shows.

Klamath County will likely continue to experience extremely low water conditions in a number of our popular lakes and rivers. Please remember to have all of the required safety equipment on board your boat and take a moment to read the following information provided by the National Safe Boating Council. The Klamath County Marine Division wishes everyone a safe and enjoyable boating experience this year and we look forward to continuing to serve both Klamath County visitors as well as the local community.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Boating Safety Advocates Remind Boaters to ‘Wear It!’

During National Safe Boating Week, May 17-23
Life jacket wear is an effective and simple life-saving strategy for safe recreational boating

(Washington, D.C.) – Boating safety advocates across the U.S. and Canada are teaming up to promote safe and responsible boating, including consistent life jacket wear each and every time boaters are on the water, during National Safe Boating Week, held from May 17-23, 2014.

National Safe Boating Week is the official launch of the 2014 North American Safe Boating Campaign. This yearlong campaign promotes safe and responsible boating and the value of voluntary life jacket wear by recreational boaters through the national theme, Wear It!

“Every day I hear about the grim consequences of not wearing a life jacket while boating,” said Rachel Johnson, executive director of the National Safe Boating Council, the lead organization for the Wear It! campaign. “You can still have fun on the water while choosing to always wear a life jacket and boating responsibly.”

U.S. Coast Guard statistics show that drowning was the reported cause of death in almost three-fourths of recreational boating fatalities in 2012, and that 85 percent of those who drowned were not wearing life jackets. That’s why boating safety advocates continue to push for increased and consistent life jacket wear on the water.

“Accidents on the water happen much too fast to reach and put on a stowed life jacket,” said John Johnson, chief executive officer of the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators. “It’s important that everyone consistently wears a life jacket while on the water and always boats responsibly.”

Today’s life jackets are comfortable, stylish and easy to wear. In fact, they don’t even have to be jackets anymore. Old-fashioned, bulky orange life jackets have been replaced with innovative options, such as inflatable life jackets, allowing mobility and flexibility for activities like boating, fishing, paddling or hunting, and are much cooler in the warmer weather.

This year during National Safe Boating Week and throughout the year, the campaign will highlight stories of real boaters whose lives were saved by wearing a life jacket. In addition, the campaign will remind boaters of the importance of boating safely, including consistent life jacket wear, boating sober, knowing navigational rules and having a proper lookout.

The North American Safe Boating Campaign unites the efforts of a wide variety of boating safety advocates, including the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators, Canadian Safe Boating Council and many members of the National Safe Boating Council. The campaign is produced under a grant from the Sports Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund, administered by the U.S. Coast Guard. Partners hold local events, teach classes, offer on-water training, distribute educational materials and perform free vessel safety checks, among other activities.

 

 

Recreational Boating Safety Facts

 

All figures are from the U.S. Coast Guard’s 2012 Recreational Boating Safety Statistics, the latest official record of reported recreational boating accidents. The full report is available online at:www.USCGBoating.org/statistics/accident_statistics.aspx.

  • Drowning was reported as the cause of death in almost three-fourths of all fatalities.
  • Approximately 85 percent of those who drowned were not wearing life jackets.
  • In 2012, the Coast Guard counted 4,515 accidents that involved 651 deaths, 3,000 injuries and approximately $38 million dollars of damage to property as a result of recreational boating accidents.
  • Approximately 14 percent of deaths occurred on boats where the operator had received boating safety instruction.
  • Operator inattention, operator inexperience, improper lookout, machinery failure and excessive speed are the top five primary contributing factors in accidents.
  • Alcohol use is the leading contributing factor in fatal boating accidents; it was listed as the leading factor in 17 percent of the deaths.
  • Twenty-four children under age thirteen lost their lives while boating in 2012. Forty-two percent of the children who died in 2012 did so from drowning.
  • The most common types of vessels involved in reported accidents were open motorboats (47%), personal watercraft (19%) and cabin motorboats (15%).

 

National Recreational Boating Statistics

  • Fatalities: 651
  • Drowning’s: 459
  • Injuries (requiring medical treatment beyond first aid): 3,000
  • Boating Accidents: 4,515
  • Property Damage: $38,011,601
  • Number of registered recreational boats in the U.S.: 12,101,936

 

2012 Top-Ranking States for Boating Deaths

Source: U.S. Coast Guard 2012 Recreational Boating Safety Statistics

 

rank

state

total deaths

1

Florida

50

2

California

49

3

Texas

32

4

Washington

30

5

New York

27

6

Louisiana

25

7

North Carolina/Wisconsin (tie)

23

8

Arkansas

22

9

Tennessee

21

10

Oregon

19

  • Klamath County Sheriff

    3300 Vandenberg Road  -  Klamath Falls, OR 97603
    541-883-5130 Monday-Friday
    Public Hours: 9am to Noon and 1pm - 5pm
    Closed Weekends and County Holidays